Tag Archives: Hispanics

Cracking the Code

Another great piece via the Harvard Business Review Blog regarding the lack of multicultural professionals in senior positions.  According to the blog, multicultural professionals hold only 11% of executive positions in corporate America.  According to a study by the Center for Talent Innovation (CTI), one of the factors leading to a lack of representation at these levels is associated with “executive presence.”

In other words, multicultural professionals such as Latinos are at a disadvantage because they’re unable to create and build professional relationships with executives similar to them:

CTI research finds that multicultural professionals, like their Caucasian counterparts, prioritize gravitas over communication, and communication over appearance. Yet, “cracking the code” of executive presence presents unique challenges for multicultural professionals because standards of appropriate behavior, speech, and attire demand they suppress or sacrifice aspects of their cultural identity in order to conform.

Additional results of the CTI study can be found here.

Latinos: It Makes Advertising Cents

Organizations are tapping Twitter to reach a more diverse clientele. Latinos are the fastest growing demographic using Twitter (and other social media tools). It would make sense that media outlets are seeing this as a “no brainer.”

It’s all about advertising dollars – and one of the reasons DirectTV has also bumped up it’s Spanish language offerings. Yes, some media outlets are going in the opposite direction. NBCLatino went idle a few weeks ago to the dismay of many on Latino social media channels.

Graphic via WSJ

Still Looking for Access

A USC study reports that Latino high school students (in California) who graduate from top schools still attend community colleges.  Regardless of the state, the barriers remain the same.

According to the study:

Previous research has found the concentration of Latinos in the public two-year sector to be attributable to many factors, including the relatively low cost, geographic accessibility, and curricular and program flexibility of community colleges.

Previous posts on this topic here, And so it goes…..

The Face of Bigotory

walkeraides

My former home state of Wisconsin made a bit of news today – and not in a good way.  Governor Scott Walker fired a campaign aide after it was discovered she tweeted insulting remarks about Latinos, referring to one as an “illegal mex”. It’s the second time in just a few months Walker has fired someone affiliated with his administration for making bigoted remarks about Latinos. Ironically, I was recently invited to Walker’s Annual Latino Holiday Event at the Governor’s mansion. Go figure.

In other news: I’m glad to be living in New York.

(Graphics via Fox News Latino)

The Educational & Earnings Divide

This is a great piece by The Atlantic regarding race, gender, and the workforce.  An interesting comparison of participation rate of Latinos, women, and other demographic groups. The disparities among Latinos and African Americans can still be attributed to one underlying issue, education:

Blacks and Hispanics, who make up about one-quarter of the workforce, represent 44 percent of the country’s high school dropouts and just 15 percent of its bachelor’s earners. Until we can close the difference between those numbers, it’s unlikely that the workforce’s unyielding racial stratification will improve.

Graphic via The Atlantic

The Road Less Traveled

A recent California study shows Latinos disproportionally attend community colleges after graduating from high school. Why? The study points to several challenges faced by Latinos:

Previous research has found the concentration of Latinos in the public two-year sector to be attributable to many factors, including the relatively low cost, geographic accessibility, and curricular and program flexibility of community colleges (e.g., Crisp & Nora, 2010; Nora & Crisp, 2009). Researchers have also pointed to systemic disparities in K-12 school quality experienced by Latinos and the consequences that attending disadvantaged and underresourced schools have on Latino student college readiness (Nora & Crisp, 2009).