Tag Archives: Higher Education

Kudos to SUNY!

Delighted to see this announcement at SUNY- Albany (right down the road!).

Governor Andrew Cuomo recently announced the appointment of Dr. Havidán Rodríguez as the first Hispanic president of any SUNY four-year college in New York State history. Rodríguez’s appointment as the 20th president of the University at Albany follows the launch of the Governor’s SUNY Hispanic Leadership Institute, charged with developing and supporting the next generation of executive-level Latino leaders across the SUNY system.

The appointment of Dr. Rodriguez follows the creation of the SUNY Latino Leadership Institute back in March.

The SUNY Hispanic Leadership Institute will focus on developing, retaining and promoting Hispanic leaders at SUNY for the positions of university president, provost, chief financial officer, chief business officer, among others. The work of the SUNY Hispanic Leadership Institute will be guided by a distinguished Advisory Council, composed of 15 recognized state and national leaders of the Hispanic and higher education communities.

Texas Latino Population & College Enrollment Up

San Antonio Express News examines trends showing Texas Latino population and college enrollments increasing while the opposite is occurring for Whites:

Between 2010 and 2015, the presence of Latinos on major Texas campuses grew as the white populations fell, according to data from the National Center for Education Statistics.

Across the board, enrollment of Hispanic students on large Texas campuses has been rising. From 2010 to 2015, the University of Texas – San Antonio saw Latino enrollment jump from about 44 percent of the entire student body to more than 50 percent, according to NCES.

The Latino population at the University of Texas’s Austin campus also jumped from 17 percent to more than 19 percent in that time period.

 

The Tale of Two Reports

I spent a couple of hours today searching for current data on Latino educational attainment and outcomes, specifically in the area of post-secondary education. I was a bit frustrated. Reports were either incomplete or dated.

Finally, I was able to find two good reports, both published this year, which provided detailed analysis. One report was from Department of Education’s (DOE) National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) entitled Status and Trends in the Education of Racial and Ethnic Groups 2017. This is a comprehensive report outlining the progress and challenges faced by different racial and ethnic groups.   The second report was from the American Council on Education’s Center for Policy Research and Strategy (CPRS) entitled Pulling Back the Curtain: Enrollment and Outcomes at Minority Serving Institutions. This report was also a comprehensive examination of educational data but focused on minority serving institutions in the United States.

Frankly, I was left a bit disheartened after reviewing the NCES report. Latinos are indeed making strides. For example, Latinos doubled the number of bachelor’s degrees awarded between 2003-04 and 2013-2014. Yet, Latinos still lag well behind other racial and ethnic groups in regards to overall post-secondary attainment. Expecting the same results, I turned my attention to the CPRS report and was pleased, but puzzled, to read this:

The completion rate for exclusively full-time students at public two-year Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSIs) was 40.3 percent using NSC data, compared to the federal graduation rate of 25.5 percent. The NSC total completion rate for public four-year HSIs was approximately 50 percent and 74.1 percent for exclusively full-time students, compared to a federal graduation rate of 42.7 percent.

Why the difference?

As compared to the NCES report, CPRS “aimed to paint a more complete” attainment and outcome picture by using data beyond that collected by the DOEcation. Another key difference between the reports is this:

As the NSC data show, the majority of students at HSIs do not attend college exclusively full time, which is significant since higher education policy is still largely rooted in the notion of a “traditional” student body that among other attributes attends college full time.

In other words, DOE education attainment reports factor in ALL educational institutions, post-secondary in this case. This is no fault of the DOE but does shed light on my initial gloomy reaction. These two reports also underscore the need to present information in a way that reveals a clearer picture of educational attainment by Latinos in the United States.

The Rigged Admissions Game

“Students from families in the bottom economic quartile comprise only three percent of enrollment in the most competitive schools, while those from the top economic quartile comprise 72 percent” – this reported by a new Jack Kent Cooke Foundation regarding college admissions. This finding more than 10 years after selective institutions made a public commitment to increase the representation of low-income students (aka – “blind admission” strategies). Video provides an overview of key findings – report can be found here.

When Smart People Do Stupid Things

Why does Halloween bring out the stupid in people – especially smart people.

The President of the University of Louisville is a smart guy.

According to President James R. Ramsey’s official biography, he has served as “Senior Policy Advisor and State Budget Director for Kentucky and Senior Professor of economics and public policy at UofL. He has served as Vice Chancellor for Finance and Administration at both the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Western Kentucky University.” Dr. Ramsey’s biographical venerations go on and on, including this objective:

Dr. Ramsey also has set the tone for encouraging diversity on campus. UofL has reached or made substantial progress on all eight of its goals set in the Kentucky Plan for Equal Opportunities.

So how does Dr. Ramsey – who remember is a very smart man and president of a major university – obtain such amazing progress in diversity?

Dr. Ramsey is in the colorful serape. Others in the picture are the President’s staff – who by the way thought this was a good idea too!

Kudos to all the University of Louisville students and the student newspaper who called Dr. Ramsey on his ignorant, thoughtless, and racist behavior.

Dr. Ramsey’s initial response was to give one of those “sorry but not sorry” apologies –

“I want to personally apologize for the recent incident and any pain that it may have caused our students, faculty, staff and the community.”

Not really an apology, right? Crisis Management 101. Ding! It seems the President hasn’t learned much since the college’s last embarrassing incident.

Dr. Ramsey’s second response (after no one bought his initial mea culpa): hire more Latinos!

Yup, that’ll fix it.

Okay, I’ve had my fun.

Lesson. For those who think bigoted barriers don’t exist for people of color and women, take a look at a prime example right here.

Who is Right, When No One is Wrong?

Two different but sometimes intersecting viewpoints about diversity and strategy.

Jonathan Jackson argues that the lack of diversity in organizations is systemic and considers race, gender, and culture a vital factor:

People talk at me when it comes to diversity, not to me, and certainly not for me. People want to solve diversity like it’s a business problem. It’s not. Diversity (read:  the need for Black and Latino creativity, excellence, and ingenuity to be fundamentally embedded into the DNA of billion dollar companies and enterprises) has business implications, and there is a case for how it can improve outcomes, revenue, idea generation, and a host of other metrics. But at its core, the issue of diversity  is a structural one. Systemic inequity has a legacy that is long, varied, and intertwined with a multitude of other issues that ‘Murica is wrestling with. It’s an autopsy in its purest form, and everyone is in the viewing room, peering down through their own vantage point, looking to make sense of the broken bones and exposed organs.

BJ Gallagher counters that race and gender are important but shouldn’t be the only focus: Continue reading