Monthly Archives: January 2014

The Trust Factor

I’ve often been asked whether race or ethnicity plays a role in the recruitment of Latino talent.  In most cases I would suggest that it doesn’t hurt to have Latinos in front of potential Latino talent. From an organization standpoint, placing Latino representatives in front of potential customers makes perfect sense.   This goes a long way in helping to build trust in the Latino community.  However, when placing Latinos at the forefront is not possible, what is the next best thing?  This recent study by Harris Interactive suggests that people who are able to build relationships, understand culture, and engage with  Latino communities are as effective in building trust.  According to the study:

When asked if it was important that their advisor understand their culture, only about one-third (31 percent of Hispanics and 36 percent of African Americans) said it was.

Graphic by Harris Interactive

Complexity and Complexions

The complexity of Latino identity is examined in the documentary, Negro— A Docu-Series about Latino Identity.  The film explores the African and Latino history in the United States, specifically Afro-Latinos from the Caribbean region. Identity, race, history and latinidad are discussed from a number viewpoints.   Ryan Hamilton discusses his perspective below – all videos can be found here.

One is the Loneliest Number

The Hispanic Association of Corporate Responsibility (HACR) shared results of its 2013 Corporate Governance Study, and the report were dismal.  Latino representation on Fortune 500 boards was 3 percent – Latinas 1percent – with only 10 Latinos holding CEO positions.

Additional details can be found here – but be forewarned, it’s bloody.

Big kudos to HACR for trying to alter these results.  The organization’s challenge is astounding. The goal to increase Latino representation from zero to one reveals the true depth of the inequity. Below is a video of their latest efforts to help turn the tide.

Still Looking for Access

A USC study reports that Latino high school students (in California) who graduate from top schools still attend community colleges.  Regardless of the state, the barriers remain the same.

According to the study:

Previous research has found the concentration of Latinos in the public two-year sector to be attributable to many factors, including the relatively low cost, geographic accessibility, and curricular and program flexibility of community colleges.

Previous posts on this topic here, And so it goes…..