Monthly Archives: November 2013

The Educational & Earnings Divide

This is a great piece by The Atlantic regarding race, gender, and the workforce.  An interesting comparison of participation rate of Latinos, women, and other demographic groups. The disparities among Latinos and African Americans can still be attributed to one underlying issue, education:

Blacks and Hispanics, who make up about one-quarter of the workforce, represent 44 percent of the country’s high school dropouts and just 15 percent of its bachelor’s earners. Until we can close the difference between those numbers, it’s unlikely that the workforce’s unyielding racial stratification will improve.

Graphic via The Atlantic

The Road Less Traveled

A recent California study shows Latinos disproportionally attend community colleges after graduating from high school. Why? The study points to several challenges faced by Latinos:

Previous research has found the concentration of Latinos in the public two-year sector to be attributable to many factors, including the relatively low cost, geographic accessibility, and curricular and program flexibility of community colleges (e.g., Crisp & Nora, 2010; Nora & Crisp, 2009). Researchers have also pointed to systemic disparities in K-12 school quality experienced by Latinos and the consequences that attending disadvantaged and underresourced schools have on Latino student college readiness (Nora & Crisp, 2009).

New York, New York!

Apologies! I realize that my last post was a couple of months ago – but for good reason.

I was in the process of relocating to New York. No, not the Big Apple, although I’m only a short drive or train ride away – the capital, Albany. I’m excited to be back in this part of the country; however, I will miss many of the colleagues and friends I made in the Midwest.

During my time in Madison, I had the good fortune to meet many inspiring Latino leaders who are working hard to empower and support an emerging Latino community. I jumped right in and was honored to serve on the board of Centro Hispano. I also helped set the foundation for the first Latino professionals organization in Madison. I’m confident significant opportunities still await the Latino community there.

The Capital region is certainly a much different environment, and in many respects, includes a much smaller Latino community as compared to Madison. Nevertheless, I’m looking forward to meeting and networking with the Latino community in my new home of New York.