Author Archives: coronino

The Trust Factor

I’ve often been asked whether race or ethnicity plays a role in the recruitment of Latino talent.  In most cases I would suggest that it doesn’t hurt to have Latinos in front of potential Latino talent. From an organization standpoint, placing Latino representatives in front of potential customers makes perfect sense.   This goes a long way in helping to build trust in the Latino community.  However, when placing Latinos at the forefront is not possible, what is the next best thing?  This recent study by Harris Interactive suggests that people who are able to build relationships, understand culture, and engage with  Latino communities are as effective in building trust.  According to the study:

When asked if it was important that their advisor understand their culture, only about one-third (31 percent of Hispanics and 36 percent of African Americans) said it was.

Graphic by Harris Interactive

Complexity and Complexions

The complexity of Latino identity is examined in the documentary, Negro— A Docu-Series about Latino Identity.  The film explores the African and Latino history in the United States, specifically Afro-Latinos from the Caribbean region. Identity, race, history and latinidad are discussed from a number viewpoints.   Ryan Hamilton discusses his perspective below – all videos can be found here.

One is the Loneliest Number

The Hispanic Association of Corporate Responsibility (HACR) shared results of its 2013 Corporate Governance Study, and the report were dismal.  Latino representation on Fortune 500 boards was 3 percent – Latinas 1percent – with only 10 Latinos holding CEO positions.

Additional details can be found here – but be forewarned, it’s bloody.

Big kudos to HACR for trying to alter these results.  The organization’s challenge is astounding. The goal to increase Latino representation from zero to one reveals the true depth of the inequity. Below is a video of their latest efforts to help turn the tide.

Still Looking for Access

A USC study reports that Latino high school students (in California) who graduate from top schools still attend community colleges.  Regardless of the state, the barriers remain the same.

According to the study:

Previous research has found the concentration of Latinos in the public two-year sector to be attributable to many factors, including the relatively low cost, geographic accessibility, and curricular and program flexibility of community colleges.

Previous posts on this topic here, And so it goes…..

Reality Check: Working for the .GOV

Yet another look at the federal workforce, which has been covered quite a bit over the years on MAC.com. In this installation, The Atlantic presents thoughts on the satisfaction rates of federal employees and why it’s hard to work for the government. The news is not good as these numbers have been decreasing recently. As for Latinos, whom comprise about 8% of federal workers, their overall satisfaction hovers around 61%, a bit higher than the average.  The full report by the Partnership for Public Service can be found here.

Graphic via The Atlantic

Living in a Bubble

I spent the K-12 years of my education surrounded by other Latinos. Diversity, as I understood it then, occurred when a non-Latino student attended our school. On occasions when a “White” student arrived, I clearly remember the challenges he or she faced in their new environment: different neighborhood, people, culture, language, and school. In many ways, it was like attending school in a different country. Being kids and/or teenagers at the time, I’m sure we didn’t make their transition any easier.

My college years in El Paso paralleled those that came before. The college and city was well over 70% Latino. Many students were Mexican Nationals who crossed the border from Cuidad Juarez daily. I was enclosed in a bi-national campus packed with other Latinos. Every cultural facet of being Latino could easily be found, but I was living in a bubble.

The bubble burst when I accepted my “first college job” and moved to Dallas. Everything changed. The fast-track management development program included only one or two other Latinos and a handful of African Americans. Gone was the familiar cultural safety net which provided support, acceptance, and confidence. The sureness that propelled me through college in less than 4 years evaporated. I suddenly felt like the new “white” students did so many years ago. I lasted only 18 months.

Karma is a bitch.

My story is not new. It’s experienced by Latino and non-Latino students every day. However, experiences like these are rarely captured and documented, especially not on film. I came across this article in The Atlantic today which focuses on the documentary, American Promise. The independent film captures the experiences of two African-American boys, Idris Brewster and his friend Seun Summers, who enter a prominent private school of mostly white students. Spanning over 13 years, the film captured the cultural and educational challenges of the two boys. More importantly, it examines how diversity has evolved to mean different things to different groups of people.

The author makes this point:

I’d argue, though, that parents of color aren’t compelled by “diversity” as much as they are by reality. Independent school administrators may be invested in preparing white students for an increasingly multicultural future (or multicultural present, since children of color now outnumber non-Hispanic white children). But parents of color like the families in American Promise are more concerned with ensuring their kids’ success in the still predominantly white spaces of the present. The job market is obviously strained for everyone, however, it continues to be remarkably stratified by race

The Face of Bigotory

walkeraides

My former home state of Wisconsin made a bit of news today – and not in a good way.  Governor Scott Walker fired a campaign aide after it was discovered she tweeted insulting remarks about Latinos, referring to one as an “illegal mex”. It’s the second time in just a few months Walker has fired someone affiliated with his administration for making bigoted remarks about Latinos. Ironically, I was recently invited to Walker’s Annual Latino Holiday Event at the Governor’s mansion. Go figure.

In other news: I’m glad to be living in New York.

(Graphics via Fox News Latino)

Are Latino Leaders Different?

Many people would argue yes.

Several Latino thought leaders argue that Latino leaders have innate leadership characteristics which make them effective leaders.  In her new book on Latino leadership, Juana Bordas argues Latino leaders are inherently more collaborative, inclusive, and community oriented. Results from my dissertation and article on leadership and emotional intelligence parallel Ms. Bordas’ contention. Why? Many of these leadership traits are cultural. It’s in our DNA.

It’s the same reason you see Latinos over-represented on social media sites like Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube.

Find Ms. Bordas new book, The Power of Latino Leadership, via Amazon (not affiliated).