Living the Dream: From the Fields to the Office

Great piece from the NYT on how more Latino agricultural workers are moving from working in the fields to managing agricultural businesses. Latino owned businesses grew 21% from 2007-2012. Sergio SIlva, a high school dropout, is profiled in the video below.  With his 30+ years of industry management, Sergio partnered with someone who knew the product – and a new business was born. The new business serves as inspiration for those working in the fields for them today.

Old News

No where is the lack of diversity in organizations more evident than in the news media. Back in May (sorry I wasn’t around for this one), MSNBC stereotyped Latinos as tequila drinking fools. About the same time, NYT ‘s Upshot made some silly assumptions about Latino identity and race. And yet again today, Upshot selects an ill advised photo of Colombian dancers as way to portray Latinos as fiesta party people in discussing Republicans and the Latino vote.

In each of these cases, a Latino on staff might have said, “You know what guys……this might not work….”

Unfortunately, the lack of diversity in newsrooms is still apparent – and unfortunate.

I’m Baaaack….

It’s been a change-filled year.

Relocating to another state is never an easy task, but I’m happy to report things are finally settling down. I love my new home state of New York. Our new town has welcomed us with open arms. With most of the big “to dos” almost complete, I’ve finally had a chance to check in and make sure my login is working – it is! : )

I’ll be seeing you soon.

Where’s Your Future Workforce? Easy as 1 + 1

Matty Iglesias reveals how the people in our work environments are getting older:

… the share of people over the age of 55 who are in the labor force has pretty steadily risen. Put that together with population aging, and the Bureau of Labor Statistics says that the share of the workforce that’s composed of people over 55 should steadily rise over time.

I’ll add another two variables to this mix: the sluggish growth of the U.S. labor force overall, and continued growth of a young Latino workforce.

It’s remarkable how many companies still don’t understand this simple equation.

Graphic via Slate

Cracking the Code

Another great piece via the Harvard Business Review Blog regarding the lack of multicultural professionals in senior positions.  According to the blog, multicultural professionals hold only 11% of executive positions in corporate America.  According to a study by the Center for Talent Innovation (CTI), one of the factors leading to a lack of representation at these levels is associated with “executive presence.”

In other words, multicultural professionals such as Latinos are at a disadvantage because they’re unable to create and build professional relationships with executives similar to them:

CTI research finds that multicultural professionals, like their Caucasian counterparts, prioritize gravitas over communication, and communication over appearance. Yet, “cracking the code” of executive presence presents unique challenges for multicultural professionals because standards of appropriate behavior, speech, and attire demand they suppress or sacrifice aspects of their cultural identity in order to conform.

Additional results of the CTI study can be found here.

Breathing Life into Main Street USA

The impact of Latino entrepreneur ship can be found in the most unique places.  Take Ottumwa, Iowa for instance.  Located in southeastern Iowa, the town is home to about 25,000 residents.  Like many Midwest towns, it has experienced a population decrease over the last few decades.  As a result, Ottumwa has its share of vacant 1960s-era Main Street buildings.

While this town has seen a decrease in its overall population, Latino residents are on the rise.  Along with this increase, there’s been a revitalization along Main Street.  Many of the vacant buildings are now home to new businesses started by Latino entrepreneurs. Latino entrepreneurship in these areas is a national trend.  Much of the credit can be given to people like Himar Hernandez, who works with small Latino businesses in the area.  Watch the video below and see how Latino small businesses are breathing new life into old towns.

Latino or Hispanic

It doesn’t matter to me – so I fall in the norm I guess. I use both terms interchangeably. A new study by NPR shows Latinos or (Hispanics!) are split.

NPR surveyed almost 1,500 randomly selected people to ask whether they would choose to describe themselves as Hispanic or Latino. We found a very slight preference for Hispanic, but not a terribly significant one.

Educating the Future

The Latino talent “pipeline” begins with education.

And as more Latinos enter colleges and universities, many in higher education still aren’t ready to manage the growth of Latinos on their campuses, including how to graduate them in higher numbers.

The Chronicle examines Latino demographic shifts and warns schools to pay attention:

Using data from the U.S. Census Bureau, The Chronicle examined by state and county the population from age 18, or zero years from traditional college age, down to age 4, or 14 years away. Younger age groups are strikingly smaller in New England, as in Rockingham County, N.H., where 18-year-olds number almost 4,500 and 4-year-olds just 2,600, a difference of more than 40 percent. With fewer young white children in almost every state, many counties’ younger age groups would be vastly smaller if not for much larger numbers of Hispanic children.

CollegeGrowth